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Three Rows Of Teeth (2016 expanded edition)

by Tom Slatter

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Three Rows of Teeth is my third album. I love it. You were expecting me to be more balanced? No, I can't be. I honestly love the songwriting on this album.

The first two tracks, Three Rows of Teeth and Mother's Been Talking to Ghosts Again, were exercises in compound songwriting - a fancy way of saying I shoved together unrelated song fragments to construct them. I used a similar approach to the final three tracks which form the Time Traveller Suite.

In between are some more traditional verse-chorus songs in Self Made Man and The Engine That Played Through Their Honeymoon. The middle track of the album, These Tiny Things Are Haunting Me, starts with a scratchy mobile phone recording of an improvised tune I recorded in my classroom between classes back when I was still teaching.

The original mix and master wasn't perfect, particularly in the higher frequencies in the first few songs. This remaster isn't a money making gimmick (as if!) but a necessary admission that as an independent one-man-band I don't always get things right.

Three Rows of Teeth might end with a three part epic, but even so this album is the closest to showcasing my indie rock influences. These are all short, accessible rock songs. They tell stories, sometimes weird, sometimes macabre, sometimes romantic; they use funny time signatures, skip rapidly through ideas and take turns at funny angles; but at its heart this is an album of simple rock songwriting. And I'm very proud of it.


released October 7, 2016

Written, performed, recorded, mixed and produced by Tom Slatter.
Mastered by David Elliott.

Design by Joe Slatter.



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Tom Slatter London

What would it sound like if Nick Cave started writing songs with Genesis after watching too many episodes of Dr Who? How many songs about replacing your body parts with mechanical alternatives is too many? Does the world need a steampunk/scifi inspired prog rock act? Tom Slatter set out to answer none of these questions, but accidentally did. ... more

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